Exploring the Ruins of Seaside Sanatorium

Seaside Sanatorium

Off a quiet shoreline street, a sign reading "Seaside State Park" adorns an entryway. From a distance, one isn't sure what exactly to expect. Trees block it's initial size, giving a little tease before opening itself up fully. The style mimics something of country mansion rather than a home for sick children. The details are stunning with its ornate designs, brick exterior, and stone archways. On a chimney, a nest with an osprey is perched above, chirping. Even in its abandonment, its beauty from its prime still stands out among the cracked glass and graffitied walls. The contrast against the gray skies is beautiful – showcasing it as a gem rather than something unnerving. 

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

In the 1930s, architect Cass Gilbert created this place for children with tuberculosis. The setting was considered a masterpiece. The ocean air and sunshine was a huge benefit to help treat the children's affliction. In the 1950s, it became a geriatric home and in the 1970s, it transformed yet again into a home for the mentally ill. Around the 1970s reports of abuse lasted until the early 1990s with it’s finally closing in 1996. Now vines have started overtaking it – surrendering its manmade bones back to Earth. 

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

For the most part, it was only us here. Tranquility on the beach, exploring things in the sand. Finding crab parts and little shells with the haunting institution in the backdrop. As I was gazing up at the building staring into a gaping hole with stairs that didn't appear to end – a bike whizzed by knocking me out of my thoughts of hoping an apparition would flutter by. 

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

Tranquility on the beach, exploring things in the sand. Finding crab parts and little shells with the haunting institution in the backdrop.

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

Modern development is quick. Historic sites are being torn down and revamped daily. My own apartments used to be an abandoned mill I drove past my whole life and even explored in my youth. 

Do you love abandoned places? Do they frighten you or are you hoping to come across something strange?

Our Trip to Walden Pond & Thoreau's Cabin

Our Trip to Walden Pond & Thoreau's Cabin

“I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.” 

Since 9th grade, this quote has always resonated with me. I remember one summer I was reading Walden and imagined what it would be like to simply live in the woods and be able to write. No sounds except the audible chirp of crickets surrounding me, the rustling of leaves, sticks breaking, and a fire crackling. I was infatuated with Thoreau. He lived the life I had dreamed of - simplicity paired with writing. It was admirable and honorable. One of my aim screen-names back in the day was actually "Je Suis Thoreau" meaning "I am Thoreau" in French. 

For whatever reason, I never actually made it up to the pond until a spur of the moment decision yesterday and I'm so happy we went on the day we did. The ride to Concord, Massachusetts was absolutely stunning. The trees were just beginning to wane from their peak. The autumn hues were miraculous, the weather was perfect, and we were completely engrossed in trees. 

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