Exploring the Ruins of Seaside Sanatorium

Seaside Sanatorium

Off a quiet shoreline street, a sign reading "Seaside State Park" adorns an entryway. From a distance, one isn't sure what exactly to expect. Trees block it's initial size, giving a little tease before opening itself up fully. The style mimics something of country mansion rather than a home for sick children. The details are stunning with its ornate designs, brick exterior, and stone archways. On a chimney, a nest with an osprey is perched above, chirping. Even in its abandonment, its beauty from its prime still stands out among the cracked glass and graffitied walls. The contrast against the gray skies is beautiful – showcasing it as a gem rather than something unnerving. 

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

In the 1930s, architect Cass Gilbert created this place for children with tuberculosis. The setting was considered a masterpiece. The ocean air and sunshine was a huge benefit to help treat the children's affliction. In the 1950s, it became a geriatric home and in the 1970s, it transformed yet again into a home for the mentally ill. Around the 1970s reports of abuse lasted until the early 1990s with it’s finally closing in 1996. Now vines have started overtaking it – surrendering its manmade bones back to Earth. 

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

For the most part, it was only us here. Tranquility on the beach, exploring things in the sand. Finding crab parts and little shells with the haunting institution in the backdrop. As I was gazing up at the building staring into a gaping hole with stairs that didn't appear to end – a bike whizzed by knocking me out of my thoughts of hoping an apparition would flutter by. 

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

Tranquility on the beach, exploring things in the sand. Finding crab parts and little shells with the haunting institution in the backdrop.

Seaside Sanatorium
Seaside Sanatorium

Modern development is quick. Historic sites are being torn down and revamped daily. My own apartments used to be an abandoned mill I drove past my whole life and even explored in my youth. 

Do you love abandoned places? Do they frighten you or are you hoping to come across something strange?

Milford Cemetery

I started a new category for the blog titled Explore & Adventure. My family and I are always traveling and visiting new places, why not share it with everyone so you can visit too? Little day trips are so refreshing to us. The little simplicities in life is what drives us. Explore everywhere, adventure anywhere is a huge motto of ours. We always are on the hunt for some place new we've never gone. Maddox proves daily that he loves checking out new spots, hiking, and everything outdoors. 

Cemeteries are one of my favorite places to visit. They're serene, calm, and peaceful. They are places hardly thought of. So many go to their final rest in cemeteries yet people are hardly there. Headstones long forgotten, visitors who once came may have passed on or moved themselves, names and stories lost. I love visiting and reading headstones. I may not have ever known the person but for a brief second they are thought of again. A reminder that they were once here among the rest of us. 

And headstones can be beautiful. Epitaphs, inspiring. Today we visited the Milford Cemetery in Milford, Connecticut and let me tell you – it's my new favorite.. hands down. I'm talking I'll be thinking about this cemetery for days type of favorite. It's one of the oldest cemeteries in CT, created in 1642 when the first body was buried. When you first enter the cemetery, the most beautiful marble statue is on display. It's so stunning that I could have stared at it for hours. The inspiration that started pouring from this Weeping Woman is astounding. I have ideas for my novel, ideas for poems. 

The four pillars on the corners are of four different women. Each representing the words that lie above them: charity, hope, love, grace. It's said that the man who wanted 

I'm less interested in things that are haunted like I was when I was younger. It's not because I'm scared because I still love all things spooky but I don't actively seek high activity areas at night anymore. I've watched too many horror movies to want to bring any negative entities home. I doubt that would happen but.. again.. too many horror movies to chance that as often as I used to (protection is always useful though). Legend has it, a woman in white has been seen walking around this cemetery at night. We didn't see her during our daylight trip but it is tempting to want to come visit at night. 

One epitaph once read:

Molly tho pleasant in her day
Was suddenly seized and sent away
How soon she’s ripe how soon she’s rotten
Sent to her grave and soon forgotten

It was the epitaph of Mary Fowler who passed at age 24. The old headstone is no longer there since it was stolen a while back. It has been retrieved but for history's sake, they gave her a new one with her name and nickname. Bummer because that epitaph is a humorous gem.

Another thing about this cemetery is there is a red sandstone obelisk dedicated to 46 Revolutionary War soldiers who died of smallpox. Along with their names, the story of Captain Stow is on the obelisk as well. He lost two sons to the war and gave up his life in order to help care for these sick soldiers. He eventually died of the disease as well. 

It's definitely a cemetery worth visiting. It's filled with rich history and tons of stories. I'll be adding a new cemeteries section to my blog from now on so keep your eyes out for more posts like this!

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Shayna Shattelroe

25 years old. Mama to Maddox. Word weaver. Lover of love. Coffee addict. Psychological science student. 

A woman of curious nature, my name is Shayna. I am wild & reserved. Humbled & proud. Quiet & clamorous. Strange & familiar. I live in the trees of New England typing away as lifestyle blogger. You can always find me with a coffee cup in one hand and a book in the other.

Blogging since 2005, I’ve had an innumerable amount of blogs on a vast number of platforms. Finally, I’ve found one to call home: The Lovely Cicada. This blog is a piece of myself I extend to you.